Fix StanleyWP WordPress Theme Portfolio Grid

Fix display of portfolio grid rows

Back in September of 2014 I wrote about using the StanleyWP WordPress theme for a portfolio site. After I added some projects, I noticed the grid on the Portfolio page template wasn’t displaying rows correctly. I even noted it in my original post, towards the end.

I’ve had a few people contact me about how to fix the StanleyWP portfolio grid issue, and earlier today Arun left a comment asking how to fix the grid issue.

You need to be using a child theme for this, it’s just good practice. If you don’t know how to create a child theme, read my post on creating a child theme. It’s really easy to do, but may require you to reset your menu or some widgets after changing to the child theme.

Anyway, Arun confirmed that this gist fixed the problem for him:

Just save that code as template-portfolio.php and put it in your child theme directory. Your portfolio should now show three projects per row. No CSS or anything else needs to be modified, just that one page template.

Let me know if you have any issues or questions.

Advertisements

Scotch Box: A Vagrant LAMP Stack That Just Works

Just a dead-simple local Vagrant LAMP stack for developers

I discovered Scotch Box recently, brought to us by the folks at scotch.io. It actually looks like Nicholas Cerminara has done most of the work, or as least done all of the committing to GitHub. Here’s the Scotch Box announcement at the Scotch.io blog.

After using Scotch Box for a day, I’ve decided this is how I will do all future development work. It’s so easy, and you really don’t need to know much about Vagrant or VirtualBox to get up and running with Scotch Box.

Scotch Box has a repository setup at GitHub that explains how to make use of Scotch Box. Basically, just clone the repository, and then run vagrant up inside that repo.

Scotch Box is currently running Ubuntu 12.04.5. Here’s a bit from the Scotch Box readme:

Scotch Box is a preconfigured Vagrant Box with a full array of LAMP Stack features to get you up and running with Vagrant in no time.

A lot of PHP websites and applications don’t require much server configuration or overhead at first. This box should have all your needs for doing basic development so you don’t have to worry about configuring Vagrant and you can simply focus on your code.

No provisioning tools or setup is really even required with Scotch Box. Since everything is packaged into the box, running “vagrant” is super fast, you’ll never have to worry about your environment breaking with updates, and you won’t need Internet to code.

Do you use Vagrant?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

Bringing Scotch Box Up

Once you’ve run vagrant up, you’ll be able to access your site at http://192.168.33.10/, you should see something similar to the image below.
scotch

Useful Stuff in Scotch Box

  • PHP 5.5
  • No Internet connection required
  • PHP errors turned on
  • Laravel and WordPress ready (and others)
  • Operating System agnostic
  • Goodbye XAMPP / WAMP
  • New Vagrant version? Update worry free. ScotchBox is very reliable with a lesser chance of breaking with various updates
  • Bootstrap and jQuery are saved in the server’s home folder in case you don’t have Internet (usually plains, trains or cars)
  • Chef and Puppet ready in case you want to add extra features on Vagrant Up
  • Super easy database access and control
    MIT License

Server Components Included

  • Apache
  • Vim
  • MySQL
  • PHP 5.5
  • Git
  • Screen
  • Composer
  • cURL
  • GD and Imagick
  • Mcrypt
  • Memcache and Memcached

Front End Stuff Included

  • NPM
  • Grunt
  • Bower
  • Yeoman
  • Gulp

You can SSH to your server as well, by running vagrant ssh. Upon logging in via SSH you’ll see something similar to the image below.
vagrant-ssh

Scotch Box is in its infancy still. It’s initial commit to GitHub was on October 6, 2014 and has about 10 commits in total.

Updating Scotch Box is easy too. To check for an updated version with Vagrant, do vagrant box outdated. That will tell you if there’s a newer version available. If there is a newer version available, you can update to it by running vagrant box update.

Head to the official Scotch Box website for more information on setting up databases, setting a hostname, and for more details on updating the box. Some basic Vagrant commands are also included to help you with basic Vagrant usage (ie: pausing, resuming, or destroying a server).

If you’re a LAMP developer like I am, and are tired of developing on your client’s dev servers, Scotch Box could be a good solution for you to develop locally. It’s sometimes much easier to develop locally then having to rely on a slow dev server provided by your client. :)

All the images in this post are included in the gallery below.

My Portfolio

I finally have one!

I’ve known for a long time that I need some type of portfolio, especially since I’m doing freelance web development full-time now.

A potential client wanted to see my portfolio. I explained that I didn’t have one for various reasons, and instead described to him some of the more interesting projects I’ve done.

After the long email describing previous projects, I decided to create an online portfolio. I had recently bought the domain longrendev.io, but wasn’t using it for anything. So, I found a nice Twitter Bootstrap based portfolio WordPress theme and got to work. The theme needed some tweaking, the grid displaying the projects was a bit messed up and needed fixed, which was very easy.

The theme I chose was StanleyWP, a simple, minimalistic portfolio theme. The best thing about it was it’s price, free.

It’s built with Twitter Bootstrap 3.0.3, which is a little old, but still gets the job done. The current version of Twitter Bootstrap is 3.2.0.

Once I get some client projects finished up, I’ll probably take some time to update StanleyWP to use Twitter Bootstrap 3.2.0, or whatever the newest version is at that point in time.

Anyway, check it out and let me know what you think. There’s a LOT of projects I still need to add, so the list of projects right now is fairly minimal. I am also going to be using that site to take project requests.

If you need a portfolio site and would like to use StanleyWP, let me know if you need help fixing up the grid issues. It’s very simple to do, but may not be so simple for someone who isn’t a developer, like a designer. :)

Meet Unyson, A Drag & Drop WordPress Framework

Features a visual drag & drop page builder that will let your users create countless pages at a drop of a dime

Got an email from Olga at ThemeFuse yesterday announcing the release of their new drag & drop WordPress framework named Unyson.

Unyson comes with many built-in extensions, and the documentation seems to be very helpful and complete. Some highlights from the Unyson home page:

  • All the built in extensions & options work in perfect harmony. You’ll find developing on Unyson a breeze.
  • Your users will love the drag and drop page builder and the customization options built into
  • All you need to do is download the Unyson WordPress framework and start developing your theme.
  • We have a lot of tools ready to help you along the way: developer manual, Trello, GitHub Support and more.

unyson-docs
Unyson also includes an extensive list of customizations and options:

  • Page Builder
  • Option Types
  • Styling
  • Sidebars
  • Megamenu
  • Backup
  • Sliders
  • SEO
  • Breadcrumbs
  • Portfolio
  • Custom Widgets

I enjoy this theme so much because it has many features that premium or paid themes have, but Unyson is free! You can download the source on GitHub.

Getting started with Unyson is extremely easy, but slightly different than how you’d typically upload a theme. Installation of Unyson is like so:

  1. Download the framework archive from the framework’s GitHub repository
  2. Extract it to your parent theme directory. After this you must have framework/ directory in parent theme. It’s mandatory to have this exact same folder structure otherwise it will not work.
  3. Include the Unyson framework by adding this line in your theme’s functions.php:

require_once TEMPLATEPATH .'/framework/bootstrap.php';

After that, you’ll need to add some more code to the beginning of all the PHP files associated with your theme. I suggest you go over the Getting Started guide and really pay attention so you get a good understanding of what Unyson can do. The documentation is really awesome, most issues or questions you could have are more than likely covered in the docs.

I haven’t had much of a chance to play with Unyson, but will get the opportunity to on an upcoming client project, so I’m really looking forward to that.

Unyson is quite new, so hopefully we will see more features as it matures. It’s definitely worth checking out.

Notejam: Easily Learn a Web Framework

The easy way to learn web frameworks

Notejam provides you with a very easy way to learn new web frameworks. All kinds of web frameworks, too:

  • PHP
  • Python
  • Ruby
  • JavaScript (node.js)

Notejam describes itself like this:

Do you know django/laravel/symfony/etc and want to try rails/flask/pyramid/etc? The easy way to start with a new framework is to compare it with frameworks you already know. The goal of the project is to help developers easily learn new frameworks by examples.

Notejam is a unified sample web application (more than just “Hello World”) implemented using different server-side frameworks. Currently most popular python, php and ruby frameworks are supported.

All implementations of Notejam are SQLite based and are launched by built-in web servers. Each implementation has steps describing how to easily install, launch, and run tests.

Notejam is developed by Serhii Komar, @komarserjio on Twitter. Notejam can be downloaded on GitHub and you can view various screenshots on GitHub, as well.